Posts tagged “Jesse Lawrence

In the Thunderdome: Doc O’Donnell

The seventh installment in the Thunderdome-Warmed and Bound Series (explained here).

Bunnies, Rats, Ferrets and Me

“I’m waiting for Suzannah to get home …”  >> Read more

Introduction for Doc O’Donnell written by Jesse Lawrence:
Doc O’Donnell gets me. Or, I’d like to think he does, anyway. Never mind that time, once, when he was quoting Arrested Development or some such and I just kept flashing back on Dirty Dancing, missing, exactly, what was going on in all this, and certainly not unsticking myself from the eighties, from where I was living for the music, through it, maybe even dreaming those rock ‘n’ roll superstar fantasies, the kind that “didn’t quite work out” for Doc, thus throwing him into the storyteller ring, allowing me to even know of him, let alone get to misquote things with or around him.

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In the Thunderdome: J David Osborne

The fifth installment in the Thunderdome-Warmed and Bound Series (explained here).

Sepp

“Sepp and Arlo Clancy raised rabbits and chickens but the chickens always died…”  >> Read more

Introduction for David Osborne written by Jesse Lawrence:
J David Osborne has until recently escaped me, and it’s not one bit his doing, but mine. I’ve had his debut novel By the Time We Leave Here, We’ll be Friends since I caught an early ripple in some certain friendly waters. However, I have yet take that Siberian trip. But then

Well, then, I caught “Three Theories on the Murder of John Wily” in Warmed and Bound. That story there, it shook something maybe not, say, familiar in me, but something I saw glimmers of elsewhere, possible futures of other people, snowballing in my brain like the Run Lola Run flash forward snap shot schemes. And now
So, now, I’m thinking on packing myself in a Eastern Europe-bound crate and seeing what, exactly, I have been missing.

—Jesse Lawrence


In the Thunderdome: Edward J Rathke

The fourth installment in the ThunderdomeWarmed and Bound Series (explained here).

Now Here is Nowhere

“The air, thousands of blades rushing over the evershifting earth. I walk nameless and faceless through a featureless land beneath an unremarkable sky …”  >> Read more

Introduction for Eddy Rathke written by Jesse Lawrence:

I’m walking down the street, half immersed in the stolen glance of a tangential thought and half immersed in the book I’m reading, in the trees I am, so far, avoiding, and I catch a peripheral spark of fancy dress. Edward J Rathke. Could that have been?

Mr. Rathke and I, we share a city and we circle similar halls, but we do these things in just such a fashion that we seem to always pass each other by, failing at formally meeting. As I shuffle the city streets, Eddy runs to alternating global corners, writing letters to himself and those he meets, his prose as mellifluous as the paths which he seems to take.

I imagine him at the ballet, simultaneously in the front row and in the wings. Or even, perhaps, in some Lynchian time-travel cinematic dream wherein he takes the place of Sami Frey.

—Jesse Lawrence


In the Thunderdome: Amanda Gowin

The third installment in the ThunderdomeWarmed and Bound Series (explained here).

Tin Man

“When you pop your knuckles you can’t wear rings …”  >> Read more

Introduction for the lovely Amanda Gowin written by The Velvet’s own Jesse Lawrence:
Amanda Gowin, like her story “Tin Man,” is a tornado in my mind. She’s caught in this secret history, a lucid dream, the way things very well may have been. Part of her, in this here history, she’s my sister, and another part of her, the flip-side, she’s this swelling platonic twin, the kind that you’d have shed blood with and sworn allegiance to before people then your age knew, even, what “acronym” meant. In all that, that world within me that only imagination and heart can reach, we’re racing—giggling, fingers entwined—her feet two steps ahead of mine, daring adventures out of me, teaching me to dance, and teaching me how to apply eye shadow just so so that Halloween can be that much more real. And when the first step is finally my turn, when I decide that jump is something I can take, she’s right there, going too, future’s possibilities opening up below us.

—Jesse Lawrence